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Hurricane Boat Anchors 18 lb - Anchor - Boats 28-34 ft

Hurricane Boat Anchors

  • $ 167.99


How To Select Your Anchor Size?
Generally when choosing an anchor as your primary front anchor, it is recommended to select it based on the 30 mph wind rating. The chart below can be used as a starting point based on your boat size, and the manner in which you use your boat. Boats 22' and under have a little more leeway in choosing an anchor size, since they are not likely to be out in 30 mph wind conditions. All anchors except the 7 lb anchor are rated for 30 mph wind conditions. The 7 lb anchor is a compact model for smaller boats, in 20 mph wind or less. It is meant to replace the low grade factory anchor typically supplied with your boat, or be used as a rear anchor or backup anchor.

How To Select Chain Length?
Hurricane Boat Anchors can function on as little as 3-4' of chain. However when using the breakaway release method it is necessary to use at least another 1-2 feet to help offset the extra weight of the chain that is placed onto the anchor's center of gravity. This will aid the anchor in setting, and not lying on its side.

Using More Chain
Using a longer length of chain will not affect the performance of your Hurricane Boat Anchor. In fact, some larger cruisers have an all chain rode. By using longer lengths of chain such as 6-12 feet, you can now use the anchor at a shorter scope, which can be especially beneficial in crowded areas, or very deep water. Having more chain can also help to compensate if using a smaller anchor. For example, your 22 foot boat does not have enough storage space to fit the 14 lb anchor. You can choose to go with the 10 lb model, and rather than only using the 3-4 foot minimum chain, increase that to 8-12 feet for offshore use, and 6-10 feet for lakes & rivers. The extra chain will help keep the anchor angled down more, and increase your holding power.


 

Breakaway Release Method

Hurricane Boat Anchors can function on as little as 3-4' of chain. However when using the breakaway release method it is necessary to use at least another 1-2 feet to help offset the extra weight of the chain that is placed onto the anchor's center of gravity. This will aid the anchor in setting, and not lying on its side.


Using The Tripline Hole
Note: It is perfectly fine to leave the anchor rigged up in this manner at all times. Just be sure to replace the zip tie(s) monthly, especially in saltwater, even if you have not broken them yet.

When rigged up this way, always grab the anchor itself to maintain control of it, and not the rope or the chain in case the zip tie breaks prematurely.

If using the anchor in an area where it is likely to slide under something and get stuck, you can use the tripline hole for easy retrieval. So instead of attaching the shackle to the rear slotted hole, attach it to the forward round hole.
Now take the chain and route it back to the slotted hole. Use one or two plastic zip ties (minimum 75 lb breaking strength) to secure the chain to the slotted hole.

Note: If using this method, the chain must be routed and secured to the slotted hole or the anchor will not set when only attached to the forward round hole.

When retrieving the anchor, draw in the line as usual to move the boat towards the anchor until you are directly above it. If it feels hung up, give the line a few solid jerks upward.

If you are unable to break the zip ties by jerking it, tie the rope to a cleat, and carefully drive forward to break the ties. It will now slide out backwards by reversing the angle of pull.

Be sure not to drive too far over the top of the anchor or you risk getting your line caught in the prop. Also be sure to replace the broken zip ties and re-secure the chain.


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